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Related Alcohol Research Documents

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Can screening and brief intervention lead to population-level reductions in alcohol-related harm? Can screening and brief intervention lead to population-level reductions in alcohol-related harm?

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Date added: 01/09/2013
Date modified: 01/09/2013
Filesize: 278.26 kB
Downloads: 2804

Author: Nick Heather (Northumbria University)

In this article, conditions that would allow a population-level effect of SBI to occur are reviewed, including their political acceptability. It is tentatively concluded that widespread dissemination of SBI, without the implementation of
alcohol control measures, might have indirect influences on levels of consumption and harm but would be unlikely on its own to result in public health benefits. However, if and when alcohol control measures were introduced, SBI would still have an important role in the battle against alcohol-related harm.

Evidence for the effectiveness & cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce alcohol-related harm Evidence for the effectiveness & cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce alcohol-related harm

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Date added: 07/25/2012
Date modified: 07/26/2012
Filesize: 1.7 MB
Downloads: 2797

Author: Peter Anderson (Maastricht University)

This report commissioned by the WHO Regional Office for Europe shows that there is a substantial evidence base on the effectiveness of different policies in reducing the harm done by alcohol. Policies that regulate the economic and physical availability of alcohol are effective in reducing alcohol-related harm. Enforced legislative measures to reduce drinking and driving and interventions individually directed to drinkers already at risk are also effective. The evidence shows that information and education programmes do not reduce alcohol-related harm; nevertheless, they have a role in providing information, reframing alcohol-related problems and increasing attention to alcohol on the political and public agendas. In all parts of the European Union, population-based interventions represent a highly cost– effective use of resources to reduce alcohol-related harm. Brief interventions for individual high-risk drinkers are also cost–effective, but are harder to scale up because of their associated training and manpower needs.